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Kate Middleton’s Bridal Gown to go on Public Display

Kate Middleton in Wedding Dress Royal wedding dress to go on public display Kate Middleton wowed the crowds on Friday when she appeared in the intricately decorated wedding dress designed by Sarah Burton of Alexander McQueen. It was the most anticipated dress of the century, and now the public could get the chance to see it up close. The dress is expected to become one of the capital’s biggest tourist draws. It is not known exactly when or where it will appear. Possible venues include the State Rooms at Buckingham Palace, which open to the public in the summer, or Hampton Court Palace, where a team from the Royal School of Needlework helped in its creation. The Victoria & Albert Museum, which has a world-renowned fashion department, is also a consideration. A Clarence House spokesman said: The Duchess of Cambridge is considering a number of options to give members of the public the opportunity to see, close-up, the skilled British craftsmanship that went into the making of her wedding dress by Sarah Burton and her team as well as the Royal School of Needlework.

Sarah Burton Designed Kate Middleton’s Wedding Dress

Kate Middleton's wedding dress is an ivory gown with lace applique floral detail designed by Sarah Burton at Alexander McQueen Well-kept secret about Kate’s wedding dress designer, is finally revealed. The gown is a design by Sarah Burton for Alexander McQueen’s fashion house. Kate Middleton chose British brand Alexander McQueen for the beauty of its craftsmanship and its respect for traditional workmanship and the technical construction of clothing. The dress is made of French Chantilly lace and English Cluny lace throughout the bodice, skirt and underskirt. The dress, made of ivory and white satin gazar, was designed to emulate an opening flower. The train measures 2.7 meters. The lace on the bride’s dress details a rose, thistle, daffodil and shamrock, and was hand-made by the Royal School of Needlework at Hampton Court Palace. Her handmade shoes, also by McQueen, were composed of ivory duchesse satin and lace. Workers washed their hands every 30 minutes to make sure the lace and threads remained pristine. Needles were swapped every three hours to keep them sharp.